The Edinburgh artist: final chapter

feathers carved from book pages

Photo by Chris Scott/Flickr

Last night, while perusing my NPR iPad app, I was delighted to find a story about the mysterious anonymous book sculptor of Edinburgh. I’d posted about this last month, but here was the final chapter.

First, the artist has remained anonymous to the end.

Second, she scorned the common assumption that she was a man. In her own words:

Often a good story ends where it begins. This would mean a return to the Poetry Library. The very place where she had left the first of the ten.

Back to those who had loved that little tree, and so encouraged her to try again …….and again.

Some had wondered who it was, leaving these small strange objects. Some even thought it was a ‘he’! ……. As if!

Third: “the first of ten”? But only eight sculptures had been found!

Check out the NPR story to learn the rest of the tale, and see photos of the final two sculptures. A longer article with many more photographs can be found at Central Station.

As for the photo above: those are the feathers of a tiny wren, carved out of a book as all of the other sculptures have been. The artistry of each sculpture has been amazing, but for me the feathers top them all. They’re simply wonderful, as is the whole story.

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About Fletcher DeLancey

Socialist heathen and Mac-using author of the Chronicles of Alsea, who enjoys pondering science, politics, well-honed satire (though sarcastic humor can work, too) and all things geeky.
This entry was posted in culture, Europe, good news. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The Edinburgh artist: final chapter

  1. Inge says:

    Absolutely love the story! All my respect to the creator.

  2. Jbrandao says:

    I had learned about this artist a couple of months ago. Amazing pieces. And the fact that she decided to remain anonymous just makes it even more wonderful. I wish they would just put the sculptures in glass cases, in their respective places, so that people can go visit not just the sculpture, but also the building it was left in

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